Thousands turn out for Kiwanis Fair


By Jason A. Smith
Times Correspondent



Excitement filled the air once again as a long-standing tradition continued for another year at the Kiwanis Henry County Fair.

The fair generated “tens of thousands of dollars” to support local charities, said David Shofman, this year’s chairman of the Executive Fair Committee for the Kiwanis Club of Henry County. He said the funds raised at the fair were “well ahead of last year,” and that approximately 20,000 people came to the fair, held over five days at Heritage Park in McDonough.



Children enjoy the bumper cars at the Henry County Kiwanis Fair. Photo by Megan Seibel



Communities in Schools of Henry County (CIS) is raising money to improve opportunities for homeless students in the area.

“Close to half of those came on Saturday,” explained Shofman. “We had one of our best Saturdays ever, and that made up for lower attendance on Friday. We did more on Saturday than we did on the other four days combined.”

The not-for-profit fair has been an annual mainstay in Henry County since the 1940s, and featured a plethora of rides provided by Kissel Entertainment, as well as games and other attractions. All profits generated from the fair go toward local charities including Haven House, A Friend’s House and the Hands of Hope Clinic.

“We’re all about raising money to serve children and families in Henry County,” said Shofman. “We are blessed to have had the opportunity to do this for our community for decades. We’re excited that we’re able to do this, not only for Henry County, but also the neighboring counties that came to our fair.”

Henry County’s 4-H program sponsored a petting zoo, one of several displays in the exhibit hall at the fair. Shofman acknowledged that other fairs were also ongoing locally last week, thus affecting attendance totals at the Henry County Fair. He said Kiwanis is working to schedule their fair at different times in the future, and said he is grateful for those who came to Heritage Park.

“We appreciate all the people that came out to support all the local charities that we support,” said Shofman.

Shofman voiced his appreciation for the backing of Henry County Parks and Recreation in putting the fair together. That support, he said, allowed fair organizers to provide free rides for special-needs children for two hours on Oct. 5.

“They supported us because they like us trying to help the community,” said Shofman. “This year we had over 600 special-needs kids participate.”

Shofman said club members are regularly commended for their continued efforts in bringing the fair to the community. He attributed the success of the fair over the years to its “good, wholesome entertainment.”

“It’s passed on from generation to generation,” he said. “We run a very clean, family-friendly fair. I think it’s just back to the family atmosphere and the nostalgia of a county fair.” “We had one of our best Saturdays ever, and that made up for lower attendance on Friday. We did more on Saturday than we did on the other four days combined.”

The not-for-profit fair has been an annual mainstay in Henry County since the 1940s, and featured a plethora of rides provided by Kissel Entertainment, as well as games and other attractions. All profits generated from the fair go toward local charities including Haven House, A Friend’s House and the Hands of Hope Clinic.

“We’re all about raising money to serve children and families in Henry County,” said Shofman. “We are blessed to have had the opportunity to do this for our community for decades. We’re excited that we’re able to do this, not only for Henry County, but also the neighboring counties that came to our fair.”

Henry County’s 4-H program sponsored a petting zoo, one of several displays in the exhibit hall at the fair. Shofman acknowledged that other fairs were also ongoing locally last week, thus affecting attendance totals at the Henry County Fair. He said Kiwanis is working to schedule their fair at different times in the future, and said he is grateful for those who came to Heritage Park.

“We appreciate all the people that came out to support all the local charities that we support,” said Shofman.

Shofman voiced his appreciation for the backing of Henry County Parks and Recreation in putting the fair together. That support, he said, allowed fair organizers to provide free rides for special-needs children for two hours on Oct. 5.

“They supported us because they like us trying to help the community,” said Shofman. “This year we had over 600 special-needs kids participate.”

Shofman said club members are regularly commended for their continued efforts in bringing the fair to the community. He attributed the success of the fair over the years to its “good, wholesome entertainment.”

“It’s passed on from generation to generation,” he said. “We run a very clean, family-friendly fair. I think it’s just back to the family atmosphere and the nostalgia of a county fair.”