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Locust Grove students march for MLK Day

 

By Melissa Robinson
Contributing Editor 

  Students at Locust Grove Elementary School “took it to the streets” in the first ever Martin Luther King Jr. Day Walk where students and faculty enjoyed a brief program inside the gym before marching outside in honor of the late civil and human rights leader.

Locust Grove Elementary students raised $370 for Noah’s Ark Farm at their march in honor of Martin Luther King, Jr.

Photo by Melissa Robinson

  Several members from Shoal Creek Baptist Church, which sits adjacent to the school on the school’s property, attended the program. Shoal Creek Baptist pastor, Deacon Willie Colvin, who graduated eighth grade from Locust Grove Elementary School in 1966, regaled the students with tales from his school days.

  Students and staff voluntarily donated $2 each to participate in the march and raised more than $370 for Noah’s Ark, which is a charity that is close to the student’s hearts. An official from Noah’s Ark was on hand to accept the donation, which will be used to help feed the non-profit organization’s many rescued animals.

  Assistant Principal Walter Shields said the walk was to celebrate the legacy of Dr. King and to keep the” Dream” alive The march was led by two of the school’s mentoring groups, the Young Men of Distinction (YMD) and the Outstanding Women Leading the School (OWLS). Both groups are made up of fourth and fifth grade students at the school. 

  Shield’s said that the walk sent a wonderful message of diversity, acceptance, and non-violent transformation to the students and community.

  According to Shields, there is also a wonderful and interesting historical connection between the Shoal Creek Baptist Church and Martin Luther King Jr., because King’s father, “Daddy” King, pastored at the church from 1930 to 1932.

  “We had a great turnout of students, staff, family, friends and community. The kids were excited to find out how much money they raised for the animals at Noah’s Ark and it just proves our event theme ‘When we come together, we can make a difference!’” said Kim Lund, a teacher and one of the event’s organizers.

 

 

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